Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Dia De Los Muertos in Dunedin: Dead-on good time

Posted By on Tue, Oct 23, 2012 at 6:25 AM

People dress up as skeletons known as Calacas and March in a procession down Main Street in Dunedin.

Participants dressed up as skeletons known as Calacas and marched in a procession down Main Street in Dunedin

Casa Tina's annual Dia De Los Muertos was celebrated in downtown Dunedin on Saturday night with good food, great jazz, and lots of Calacas (skeletons) and mojigangas (18-foot-tall puppets). Dia De Los Muertos direct translation is Day of the dead, but during the celebration it really implies the return of the souls. It is traditionally a Mexican celebration in connection with All Saints Day and All Souls Day, Nov. 1 and 2 respectively. Those who celebrate this day base their ideas in the Mexican Indians belief that death is a part of life and the dead should be honored not feared.
A typical <em>ofrenda</em> might have candles, libations (traditionally tequila), possessions of the deceased, and sometimes money as offerings in case they come back and need it fixed
A typical ofrenda might have candles, libations (traditionally tequila), possessions of the deceased, and sometimes money as offerings in case they come back and have a debt to pay
.

Drummers led the procession.
Drummers led the procession down Main Street in downtown Dunedin Saturday night

Brian KoStar did his own makeup for the celebration.
Brian KoStar did his own makeup for the celebration by painting just half his face.
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Unlike the scary nature of Halloween, Dia De Los Muertos is a national holiday in Mexico. The Dunedin version featured ofrendas (items left on private altars as gifts), libations, and a free family-friendly procession down Main Street led by drummers and accented by giant puppets.

Calaca!

Calaca!

The band La Lucha entertain downtown Dunedin with great jazz as they were surrounded by puppets, candles, and an altar.

The band La Lucha entertain downtown Dunedin with great jazz as they were surrounded by puppets, candles, and an altar.

one of the 18 foot puppets marches in the parade down Main Street.
One of the 18 foot puppets (mojigangas) marches in the parade down Main Street

one of the traditions of the celebration is to make it celebrates the dearly departed with private altars of gifts known as ofrendas
Part of the celebration is to make private altars of gifts known as ofrendas. In this one a picture of the deceased along with gifts are seen
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Tina Marie, one of the owners of Casa Tina
Tina Marie, one of the owners of Casa Tina and organizer of the nights events is pictured with one of her creations
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